Songs of Near and Far Away: A Fairytale Oracle

Also available at http://marilynroxie.com/writing/interactive-fiction/songs-of-near-and-far-away

An oracle by Marilyn Roxie. Coming upon the compelling, fairytale sweet, and mysterious pictures and verse of Edith Richardson’s Songs of Near and Far Away (1900) during a search through The British Library’s public domain collection inspired the creation of this 33 card oracle deck based on her charming book.

Continue reading Songs of Near and Far Away: A Fairytale Oracle

HE – An Adult Interactive Story

Also available at http://marilynroxie.com/he

HE is an adult interactive story by Marilyn Roxie exploring sex and romance through a trans/queer lens of meandering dreams, thoughts, and fantasies.

HE is a confounding web of transient beauty, the switch between dominance and submission, and the senses for you, the reader, to untangle. You may find that retracing your steps reveals new thoughts in certain previous passages. There are five possible endings depending on the paths you take. See what you find in taking unexpected routes. Restart and alter your course if you reach dead-ends or looping roads.

HE includes adult content.  Please play only if you are over 18 and comfortable with this.

The Public Tarot: Generative Fortunes

Also available at http://marilynroxie.com/thepublictarot

A generative tarot reader by Marilyn Roxie. The Public Tarot was made with open-source, interactive fiction software Twine. Purple text indicates word associations with the 78 Rider-Waite tarot images given by 31 survey respondents who ranged in familiarity or lack thereof with the tarot. These responses were then remixed with text from A.E. Waite’s The Pictorial Key to the Tarot (1911), which is now in the public domain.

The tarot card images are of the 1909 Rider-Waite deck illustrated by Pamela Coleman Smith, originally scanned by Holly Voley and sourced from the Internet Sacred Text Archive. These images are in the public domain and have been passed through a 16-bit color filter.

Special thanks to survey-takers, troubleshooters, and play-testers:

Hune Ceaulage, ChapelR, Barbara D’Aversa, Devon, the Digital Futures class at Manchester Metropolitan University, feodoric, GoblinSpaceWizard, Nolan Harris, Kelly Jones, Michelle Jones, Ciel King-Williams, Ryan Daniel Koenig, litrouke, The Mad Exile, Ruth Miller, Natari, Ocean, Fex Orumwense, Daisy Polaski, Elsie Profilio, qdot, Ruune, Ant Shea, Tala, Nicholas van der Waard, Wendy, Nam Vo, Bishop Xiong, and all anonymous survey respondents.

The background image is a photograph taken by Rodion Kutsaev and the cursor icons are by MadameBerry, both licensed in the public domain.

Dennis Cooper’s Blog: Marilyn Roxie presents … Video Game Photography

A personal association of games with photography and film has been with me since the gift of a Nintendo 64 as a child. Super Mario 64 was the first 3D game I had ever played, quite a jump from my previous experience with the Nintendo Entertainment System and Atari. Super Mario 64’s immersive landscape and tricky moments — such as those requiring wall jumps and other maneuvers to progress and avoid or defeat enemies — required manual use of the build-in camera controls. These controls were embodied in the Lakitu, the camera-man who follows Mario/the player, through the game. While Super Mario Bros. 3’s curtains and hanging landscape elements evoked a theater stage play, the crucial presence of Lakitu in Super Mario 64 seemed to transform the game into a movie.

Some of my most beloved Nintendo 64 games required extensive manual camera fiddling or waiting for the camera to sort itself out. Playing them again years later, I wonder how I ever got through these games without endless frustration. Donkey Kong 64 and Castlevania 64 have notoriously bad camera controls and break a sense of immersion in the world, while a game like The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time has excellent handling, allowing easy maneuvers that encourage exploration.

Read more on Dennis Cooper’s blog